Exhibition: "The Holocaust in Comic Books" – Berlin

It's a fact that comic books are not always funny - even if a lot of people still seem to think so. Art Spiegelman was the one who settled this question for us, starting in the early 1980s. By telling his father's personal story of how he survived the Holocaust and Hitler's concentration c...


Tunnel 57 – Stories from the underground

Stories revolving around the Berlin Wall are tragic, sometimes exciting, maybe also a little unbelivable. Even today it seems fascinating what risks "good" GDR citizens were prepared to take on to escape their government's regime. The exhibition "Tunnel 57 – Geschichte im Untergrund/Histor...


Let me think - "I seem to remeber something here..."

Berlin based illustrator Flix was one of the first ones to create a comic series on the issue of Germany divided and reunified. Quite in time for the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 2009. For two years he had been producing newspaper cartoons on an regular basis...


What it's like on the other side: The Berlin Wall

"drüben!" ("the other side!") is Simon Schwartz's (Packeis) comic book debut combining a most important chapter of recent German history with his personal experience and fate. He recounts the story of his parents who had to make a difficult and life-changing decision: In the early 80s th...


Maximilien Le Roy: The wall - Reporting from Palestine

"DIE MAUER - BERICHT AUS PALÄSTINA"/"The Wall – Reporting from Palestine" by Maximilien Le Roy (born 1985 in Paris) has been published in Germany in March 2012. The book tells the story of Mahmoud Abu Srour who lives on the West Bank. His daily life is largely affected by Israel's barricad...


Comic book stories about walls

Growing up in the 80s it seemed kind of impossible to avoid Pink Floyd's "The Wall" – the song could be heard day in day out on the radio. Its ambguity was kind of unambiguous. And even today its essential question remains: "Why on earth do people like to build walls?" The list of those –...


A noble cause: Creator owned Image Comics

If you can't change the world, change yourself! A number of comic book star artists were quite unhappy with the way publishers had been doing business up until the early 90s. Especially Marvel Comics was known for their anti-creator-pro-Marval strategies. To change them seemed impossible a...


Superman, Superman. Who owns you?

George Lucas is an envied man. Creating the "Star Wars" Universe turned him into one of Hollywood's richest and most famous directors. After the first part of his space saga hat turned out a great success, he did something crazy: he declined an offer for better payment on the follow ups an...


Beat the bloody Romans: Asterix and Obelix

Albert Uderzo, colourblind, son to Italian immigrants, self made comic artist, celebrated his 85th birthday in 2012. His creations Asterix and Obelix were a most important part of a 70s childhood in Europe. Just like "nutella"! Mh chocolaty goodness! And so it happened that the adventures...


Worth millions: Batman 1st appearance

"1939 Batman comic sells for more than $1M – Sale sets new world record for amount of money paid for a comic book". Incredible comic book related headlines like these have a vast impact. All the big newspapers like The Observer and The New York Times print them on their front page and even...


Of girl wonders and psychopaths: Frank Miller's "Dark Knight"

When Frank Miller initiated the return of one of the great superheroes of the US comic book industry in 1986, he caused a landslide. "The Dark Knight Returns" was going to be the first comic book ever to be noticed by mainstream media, at the same time completely raising the standards for...


Master of the black line: About the Inker

The "Inker" in the US is often called "finisher", "embellisher" or "tracer". As one of the main artists working on a comic book it falls to him to "beautify" or "polish" the penciller's work. Or simply put: He's the one to add the crucial lines and textures. As a rule the famous black "Ind...


A manifest: comic book visions of architecture

There are quite a few manifestos – some are famous, some forgotten. Copenhagen based Architects BIG found a very interesting way to publish theirs: as a comic book. Easy to read, yet radical – what else would you expect from a decent manifest. The book conveys the individual agenda of mode...


Urban visions – comics and architecture

Ever since man learned how to transform his visions into something solid, to plan and build things – say "houses" – he has been drawing architecture. And of course – when built – it soon turned into an elementary source of inspiration. Now those of you who tried, will admit it rather soone...


Marshall Rogers, Batman and the laughing fish

American comic book artist Marshall Rogers (January 22, 1950 – March 24, 2007) worked on one of the first graphic novels in 1979 – "Detectives Inc." – and today may be best known for his 1970s Marvel and DC series. His contribution to characters like Batman and the Silver Surfer stands out...